SIOP Presentation Guidelines and Suggestions, 2019

Tracey Rizzuto
Program Chair, SIOP 2019
Louisiana State University

One of the most frequently cited benefits of SIOP membership is the annual conference. The quality of presentations sets the tone for much of the conference.  Typically presentations are of high quality and clarity. These guidelines outline what contributes to high quality. By providing a common set of guidelines unique to each type of session format, we hope to greatly reduce problems (e.g., running out of time, unreadable visual aids, lack of coordination between PowerPoint presentations) and enhance the audience experience.

For the less experienced, the guidelines can serve as a resource for helpful tips and information. For the more experienced, consider the guidelines as a refresher. 

Thank you for contributing to SIOP and to our field by sharing your research, knowledge, and experience!

 

Get Your Attendees to Rate Your Session on Whova!

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Promote your session by uploading your presentation to my.SIOP

my.SIOP Upload Instructions

To help promote your sessions at SIOP and to assist attendees in preparing for the event ahead of time, we would like you to upload your SIOP 2019 presentations, handouts, and/or posters onto my.SIOP.

The my.SIOP document library is password protected and available only to SIOP members.

Please upload documents from everyone in your session who wishes to share them. It is quick and easy to upload your materials:

  1. Login to your my.SIOP account on www.SIOP.org and click on “SIOP Document Library” under the “Resources” drop-down menu.
     
  2. Rename each of your presentation files to begin with your session or poster number (Example: 115 Social Networking Panel). Tip: Find your session number in the Searchable Program.
     
  3. Open the “SIOP Conference Presentations” folder and then open the folder for 2019 and for your presentation day. Select: Thursday, Friday, or Saturday.
     
  4. Upload your files. Click the upload icon under “Actions” and drag your files to the browser window. You’re done!

By uploading your files, you help those who plan to attend your session to get the most out of it, and you make it easier on yourself—less time spent responding to email requests for presentation materials after the conference! They’re all on my.SIOP.

Help Promote the 2019 SIOP Conference!

Promote the SIOP 2019 Conference!

We hope you are as excited about SIOP’s 34rd Annual Conference as we are! Why not show your pride with some conference swag for your email, social media, or website?

If you will be attending or presenting at the conference, let others know about your plans by adding one of our custom web tags to your e-mail and website. If you are a conference partner, use our graphics to let everyone know you support SIOP! All you have to do is save the appropriate image below—presenter, partner, or attendee—to your computer and insert it into your e-mail signature, social media, or website using the following directions:

Website / E-mail

To insert into a webpage:

  • Copy link below image and insert into page HTML or
  • Right click and save image to computer and insert into page

To insert into e-mail signature:

  • Right click and copy or save image
  • Open signature menu in e-mail to edit an existing signature or create a new one
  • Paste or insert image into signature and save

If you wish to add a link to the image, please use http://my.siop.org/Conferences/2019-Conference to send visitors directly to SIOP’s conference page for more information.

The conference graphics will be added here soon.

Presenter Checklist and Recommended Resources

2018 Conference Presenter Checklist

 

Have you defined your goals for your presentation? What do you want the audience to learn that they didn’t know before? Do you have a “call for action” that you want to convey?
 
Does your presentation connect with those of others in your session? Aligning with others’ messages will help produce a session that is thematically integrated, enhancing its impact
 
Have you budgeted time appropriately? Take into account timing for the full session including potential overruns; timing can vary substantially between practice and live presentations
 
Have you simplified your visuals and made them legible for the entire audience? Note that figures and graphics tend to be more impactful than text and that audience members may be seated up to 75 feet from the presentation screen
 
Have you clearly communicated the structure of the presentation? If audience members are aware of your plans for the presentation, clarity and memorability will increase
 
Have you summarized your presentation’s key points and audience implications? Consider implications for the full scope of the SIOP audience spanning affiliations, countries, etc.
 
Have you practiced your presentation to ensure it engages and connects with the audience? Practicing with a colleague who can time you and provide feedback can be particularly beneficial
 
Have you indicated where and how the audience can learn more about your topic? Make it easy for the audience to request and ask questions about your content

We have also identified several “quick-read” resources providing presentation tips and techniques for new and experienced presenters alike.  These resources were selected to match comments made by past SIOP attendees about the factors distinguishing high-quality presentations. We recommend at least a brief review of these authors’ suggestions while planning your presentations!

Further detailed suggestions can be accessed: http://www.siop.org/Conferences/18Con/Presenters/

Presenter Guidelines for Reproducible Research at SIOP 2019

SIOP 2019 Reproducible Research Presenter Guidelines

Congratulations on your accepted submission(s) and thanks for your interest and willingness to help advance reproducible research (RR) in its second year at SIOP2018!  For a refresher on what RR entails and the potential benefits it brings to SIOP2018 and our research and practice more generally, please refer back to the SIOP RR Submission Guidelines.

The focus herein will be more tactical, explaining how to move from agreeing to participate in RR for a SIOP2018 session to explaining the steps required to make it happen before the conference.  In general, the goal would be to have all RR presenters submit and post their data and code before the conference so that individuals attending the sessions might have an opportunity to access the data and source code in advance.  The earlier each presenter can make the materials available, the better.

First, we provide and outline the general steps to make your information available for SIOP2018. Second, we provide links to resources which provide guides and tutorials specific to getting started with three different commonly used file sharing applications.

Step 1:  Establish an account with a cloud-based code/data sharing provider

  • Many free sharing applications are available that are compatible with RR. 
  • If you do not already have one, establishing a free account with one of these providers will allow you to upload and share your data and code files with the broader SIOP community. 
  • A few examples of file sharing providers include GitHub, Google Drive, Dropbox, figshare, dryad, zenodo, and Academic Torrents.
  • Links to resources to assist with getting started with GitHub, Google Drive, and Dropbox are provided later in these presenter guidelines.
  • GitHub works very well with open source statistical software such as R.  GitHub can handle very large datafiles and code files, but it requires more technical skill to learn and use.  This application is commonly used by programmers for open source software development projects. 
  • Dropbox and Google Drive are more intuitive and user friendly and were designed with a broader audience in mind.  Thus, these file sharing applications carry a less steep learning curve to get started.    
  • In summary, all data sharing applications carry unique pros and cons, and there is not one right way to engage in RR. 
  • While there are no restrictions on which application you choose to use to share your RR data and code, we encourage you to try out several to get a better sense of each application’s features and to determine which one you like the best for sharing your research.    

Step 2:  Ready your materials for uploading

  • Remove potentially sensitive or restricted information
    • Remove any potentially sensitive information, such as personally identifiable information associated with your sample.
    • Ensure you are comfortable with having all contents contained within the final data and code you plan to share made public, and also ensure that you have obtained the proper approvals to share the data and code as may be necessary. 
    • If you have concerns or restrictions related to sharing your data, we would encourage you to create a mock datafile with similar characteristics of the original data to share in its place.
  • Prepare your code/syntax 
    • At the top of your syntax file, indicate in a programmer note the name of the statistical software program in which the code is written.
    • Add helpful programmer or commented notes in the base code to offer additional context, instruction, or clarity for your SIOP colleagues accessing the materials.
  • Prepare your data file
    • Label the data file in a manner that will be intuitive for your colleagues associate with your accepted presentation.
    • Creating a data dictionary is an example of a way you can aid others in interpreting your data file.
  • Save the code and data into formats compatible with open source sharing
    • If the code and data you share was not created in an open source analysis program such as R (i.e., if you conducted the analysis using SPSS, SAS, MPLUS, etc.), please save the final code you plan to share as a text (.txt) file and the data in a commonly used spreadsheet format such as Microsoft Excel or Google Spreadsheets.   

Step 3:  Upload your materials and make them retrievable

  • Upload the supplemental materials you intend to share with the broader SIOP community related to your presentation.
  • Gather your hyperlink(s).  We recommend sharing so that the files can be viewed and downloaded, but that the original cannot be modified (e.g., in Dropbox, sharing a link as “view only”).
  • Test the shareable hyperlink(s) to ensure the links provide access to the materials you desire and function in the manner you intended.
  • Send your hyperlink(s) to SIOP by emailing them to Rob Stilson at robstilson@gmail.com.
  • Hyperlinks will be cataloged in a document available to all SIOP members.
    • Please also share the following information:
      • Session Type (Poster, Symposium, etc.), Presentation Title, Content Area(s), Presenter, Code/Syntax Language (R, Python, SPSS Syntax, etc.), Reproducible Analyses (CFA, Cluster Analysis, SEM, Various Data Viz, etc.), Data Shared? (Y or N)

Step 4:  Present your RR at the SIOP conference

  • Plan to spend 1 minute at the end of your presentation sharing with the audience that your presentation uses RR.  Let them know how they can get access to your materials. 
  • Consider creative sharing methods such as providing your Twitter handle, short URLs, or a QR code to link to your shareable materials for easier access.
  • Insert information into your presentation materials highlighting the specific RR qualities and aspects of your presentation.
  • We recommend inserting the following details within your presentation content:
    • RR logo (copy logo from here)
    • Short description of type of RR materials made available (e.g., syntax; data; etc.)
    • Statistical software/coding language utilized with analyses/syntax (e.g., R, SPSS, MPlus)
    • URL to access RR materials: (e.g., github address)
    • Consider other helpful information such as types of analyses conducted

Resources and Reference Guides

2018 SIOP Conference Presentation Guidelines and Suggestions

Below, several links to resources are provided to help guide new users through getting started with three commonly used sharing platforms.

GitHub.  To use GitHub, you can find instructions on getting started by visiting the GitHub Hello World guide.  You can also explore additional guides made available on the GitHub website.  The GitHub YouTube channel provides video tutorials.

Dropbox.  To establish a Dropbox account, go to https://www.dropbox.com and view the information available on the primary webpage that walks you through features and setting up an account.  If you need additional assistance, you can explore the Dropbox Help Center.  Exploring the Dropbox YouTube channel or searching YouTube for Dropbox Tutorials may also be beneficial.

Google Drive.  A Google Drive account can be established by visiting https://www.google.com/drive/.  From this page, you can also find links to information about using Drive, as well as the Google Drive Help page.  As with the prior two, exploring YouTube for Google Drive video tutorials may also be beneficial.

Conclusion

Thank you again for your willingness to contribute toward increasing the collective knowledge-base and level of transparency within the broader I-O community.  Any additional questions about SIOP Reproducible Research not answered above or in the SIOP RR Submission Guidelines should be directed to Rob Stilson (robstilson@gmail.com) of the 2018 Program Committee. 

Guidelines for All Session Types

2019 Guidelines for all Session Types

Plan, plan, plan!

Planning is paramount. It is the single most important thing you need to do as you develop your poster/presentation. Clearly thinking through your objectives and logically outlining the content of the poster/presentation are keys to a high-quality presentation.

Identify your fundamental message or main point.

What is your purpose? What do you hope to achieve? What message do you want to get across to your readers/audience? While this may seem simple or obvious, many times a presenter’s purpose is not clearly understood or is unrealistic. Determine exactly what you want to communicate and design your poster/presentation with that purpose in mind.

Focus on the essentials/avoid losing the audience in details.

First, be aware from the beginning you have limited time (for presentations) or space (for posters) for presenting. Second, recognize people can only absorb a limited amount of information in such a short time frame. Avoid the strong tendency to want to tell all. Your poster/presentation should not resemble a detailed technical paper or report. Rather, it should focus on a few key points that will provide your audience with important information and implications.

With that said, this guidance is not intended to encourage shallow treatment of complex issues, nor should it lead to exclusion of details critical to the research presented. Rather, it is meant to emphasize the importance of properly targeting the best information to present in your limited time. Sufficient information should be presented so that the audience can understand the quality of the inferences and conclusions drawn.

Be prudent in your use of statistics.

It’s easy to overwhelm readers/listeners with too many numbers. Use data to support your conclusions or key points, when necessary, and always be prepared to answer follow-up questions regarding additional material. For presenters, it is appropriate to say more details can be provided after the talk or in the paper. For posters, those interested in the full paper can be sent an electronic version.

Offer conclusions and recommendations.

Don’t leave it up to your readers or audience to draw their own conclusions. You should leave your audience with a clear understanding of how they can use, or learn from, the information you presented. Providing recommendations for additional research and practice is an important part of your role as a presenter.

Practice.

Whether you have years of experience, or will be giving your first presentation/paper ever, everyone can benefit from practicing both the presentation and explanation of the research. If your colleagues, after an informal practice presentation, don’t clearly understand some elements within your presentation, your audience at SIOP certainly won’t either. Further, your colleagues will almost always think of issues/questions you have not, and this will allow you to better anticipate and address critical inquiry.

Distribute your paper.

A good presentation entices others to read the complete paper. In the past, distribution of papers occurred at the conference. Many people still use this method; however, the flexibility of e-mail and the internet for distributing such papers has lessened the need to carry as many papers to a conference, and electronic is certainly the more “green” alternative. Gathering business cards is an easy way to remember who to send papers to after the conference.  You may also want to ensure that your contact information is up to date in my.SIOP and the SIOP directory so that anyone interested in your paper can easily contact you.

Stay true to what was submitted

Your presentation was accepted based on the submitted proposal, and it is advertised in the program according to the submitted abstract.  Keep this in mind as you are creating your presentation and designing the details of the session. Alignment between the advertised session and actual content will ensure that attendees "get what they bargained for," increasing satisfaction.

Use Social Media to Spread Your Message

Social media platforms such as LinkedIn and Twitter can dramatically expand your work’s reach and influence. Use these platforms yourself, and make it easy for others to share your content too. Before, during (e.g., include your social media handles and hashtags on your presentation slides!), and after the conference, promote your session – see here, here, and here for great examples of your colleagues doing this on Twitter already. By including the #SIOP19 hashtag and 1-2 other hashtags related to your content (e.g., #iopsych, #hiring, #analytics, #safety), others inside and outside the SIOP community will be much more likely to see your message; try out an evocative image and curiosity-inducing headline too to drive further engagement.

Alternative Session Types

2018 Alternative Session Types

Given the diversity in format, we do not have specific suggestions for alternative session type presentations. However, general guidelines for effective presentations should be followed for these session types.

Additionally, it is important to keep in mind that this is an “alternative” session type. Attendees will be coming to your session expecting a different experience in some noticeable way. Don’t approach the planning the same way you would any other format, and make sure they leave feeling like it was correctly labeled as an “Alternative Session Type”.

Presentation Suggestions for Debate Sessions

SIOP Presentation Suggestions for Debates

The debate session type is an effective way to present opposing views about a topic. One structure for a debate is to have a moderator and two, 2-person teams. The debate begins with the moderator stating a position. One team then presents arguments that affirm the proposition and the other team presents arguments against the proposition. Each team member has a fixed amount of time (e.g., 10 minutes) to present arguments. Time for rebuttal can be incorporated into the sessions and/or a discussant can sum up the main points of the session. When submitting a debate proposal, be sure to include a statement of the proposition to be debated and descriptions of the major points likely to be argued by each side. Submissions that do not have at least two presenters with different affiliations in the session (i.e., every presenter cannot be from the same institution) will not be accepted.

Suggestions for Effective Debates

Planning is Paramount (See SIOP Guidelines for All Session Types)!

  • Have your discussion points completed early enough to send to other session members.
    • The best debates are those where debaters have had time to carefully consider their own and the other side’s point of view.
  • Realize that the chair is in charge.
    • The chair has the job of moderating the session and ensuring it runs smoothly. So please respect his/her position. If you run long, don't get mad at the chair for telling you to sit down. By adhering to the chair' suggestions, the session should run more smoothly for everyone.
  • Respect other presenters' time.
    • You want time to discuss your point of view and so do the other presenters. Please respect their time as it is the polite and courteous thing to do.
  • If you use visual aids, be sure they are accessible.  
    • Describe the information presented in your visual aids.
      • Help the audience see the information by describing and summarizing what's being presented.
    • Use the microphone.
      • Even if many audience members can hear you without it, those with hearing disabilities may not. Also, each presentation is recorded and sold, and if you are not using the microphone, it is often difficult to be heard on the audio.
    • Allow extra time for reviewing information presented on visual aids.
      • Assume that some members of your audience will need time to look at the visual aids and then focus their attention on you for further information.
    • Show enthusiasm for your point of view!

Suggestions for Effective Debate Chairs

  • Preparation is the key to success.
    • Planning for the session and helping presenters prepare will contribute to an interesting and informative session overall.
  • Plan the use of time.
    • Start and end the session promptly. As presenters are approaching their time limits, give them a prearranged signal that they should begin to conclude their presentations. You may need to stop a presenter in order to keep the session on track. To do this, you may want to politely say, “we really need to move on so we can stay within our allotted time.”
    • Plan a logical and informative segue between each presentation, so that the debate flows smoothly and the audience understands clearly how the presentation being introduced is related to the other presentations.
    • The best way to ensure the session runs on time is to let presenters know before the conference how much time they will have and the order in which they'll be presenting.
    • Prepare an overall plan and approximate time schedule for the session. Allow sufficient time at the end of the session for audience discussion and ample time for setup of the next session in the room.
    • Encourage your presenters to practice their presentations to be sure they won't exceed the time allotted.
    • Be sure to sit in a visible position for the presenters to easily see the cue, and that presenters know where you will be during the presentation beforehand. A good rule of thumb is to let presenters know when they have 5, 2, and 1 minute remaining in the presentations.
  • Help presenters prepare well before the debate.
    • Offer to review the presenters' presentation, plans, visuals, or handouts. Note any duplication in the content and suggest revisions to avoid excessive repetition.
  • Try to ensure that session members and the discussant can review each other's discussion points before the conference.
    • It will be much easier to see similarities and differences between perspectives when everyone has a chance to consider them beforehand. It will also be possible to reduce redundancies in the presentation. A particularly effective strategy is for the moderator to provide some guidance for how the session will go (e.g., who goes first). This way, other presenters will know whether or not they should spend time on introductory material. If the presentations all address different aspects of a topic area, moderators may consider spending a few minutes discussing the topic area more generally so that each presenter can focus on what is unique in his/her perspective.
    • This may be difficult, as some presenters will simply not prepare until right before the conference. But as a general rule of thumb, session members should have any potential materials to the discussant at least 2 weeks before the conference (some may want more time, so be sure to check).
    • One useful technique is to set up an e-mail list that includes all session members. This makes it easier to communicate, and ensures that everyone has access to the same information.
  • Moderate the debate and audience discussion.
    • Provide a clear description as to the nature of the debate at the start of the session to orient the audience to the issues.
    • Repeat each question or comment before responding so that all can hear. A few minutes before the session is scheduled to conclude, politely announce that the next question will be the last. If necessary, politely interrupt the speaker.
    • Try to encourage a friendly feel to the session.
  • Work collaboratively with the discussant and presenters.
    • Together, can you come up with an interesting spin to the session? Are there unique perspectives that can be addressed?
  • Show enthusiasm for the session.
    • Your first few comments will set the tone for the entire session. If you can show excitement for the session, it is more likely that the audience will as well.

Suggestions for Effective Debate Discussants (when appropriate)

  • Remember that you can make a big difference.
    • The discussant can tie a diverse set of perspectives together into a coherent theme. In many cases, the discussant can make an otherwise good debate exceptional. The best way for this to happen is to prepare in advance.
  • Be constructively critical.
    • A discussant who finds nothing to add to a set of papers is as uninformative as a discussant who finds nothing good with them. Remember, you were asked to be the discussant because you are the expert. Now is the chance for you to demonstrate your expertise and provide insight into the domain of study. You may not like a particular perspective, but please do critique it in a professional manner. Remember, critique the research/ideas, not the person behind them.
    • Try to find at least one:
      • good thing to say about each perspective
      • limitation of each perspective
      • connection among the set of perspectives
      • implication for research
      • implication for practice
    • Try to avoid spending too much time on each person's presentation individually; focus on connections across presentations and general themes. Be sure to give each presentation equal attention.
    • Overall, focus on the positive.
  • Have general discussion points prepared beforehand.
    • The best way to guarantee an interactive session is to have a set of discussion points that strike to the heart of the session. You may summarize key points of the debate and try to find some common ground.
    • Please have at least a couple of questions ready for the audience (e.g., has anyone found this in your own research?).
  • Try to avoid excessively talking about your own research.
    • Although you may have useful research that bears on the issues, remember that your role is to discuss and critique the presentations. This is not the forum for introducing your new ground-breaking study. Mention it if it is relevant, but focus the vast majority of your attention on the presenters research.
  • Realize that you might not have much time.
    • Even the most well-intentioned session chair cannot control some presenters, and it is possible that the session will leave you with little time. Anticipate what would be the one or two comments you would want to make sure everyone hears. And if a presenter does take too much time, please take the higher road and avoid the temptation to chastise the presenter for his/her inconsideration.
  • Realize you might not receive the papers in advance.
    • If everyone does their job, this won't be issue. Don't assume they will, and that you might have to comment on the presentation while it is given. Having read and commented on the other papers beforehand will make this easier for you.
  • Give presenters a copy of your remarks.
    • Many presenters will not have the time or energy to write down everything you say. Providing them with your comments after the session could help your comments have greater impact.

Presentation Suggestions for Master Tutorial Sessions

Master Tutorial. The primary purpose of the master tutorial is to provide current information and to educate the audience about a topic. As examples, tutorials might be developed to provide an update on a specified content area, discuss a new statistical technique, or describe how knowledge from another discipline can be applied to a problem or topic. Topics that are not appropriate include descriptions of products that the presenter is marketing. Proposals for tutorials should describe the specific content to be taught in the tutorial and indicate whether the coverage of the material will be basic or advanced. If appropriate and meeting APA requirements, as a service to our members, continuing education credit (CE credit) will be assigned to these sessions. For this reason, all Master Tutorials must be at least 80 minutes long. Additionally, to facilitate this process, all submissions for master tutorials must include 3-4 learning objectives (e.g., “Participants will be able to identify the various antecedents and consequences of counterproductive work behavior) and curricula vitae for all presenters.

Suggestions for Effective Master Tutorial Presentations

Planning is Paramount (See SIOP Guidelines for All Session Types elsewhere on this page)!

  • If co-presenting, have your presentation done early enough to send to other session members.
    • The best sessions are those that have a coherent theme and are well integrated. This is best accomplished when session members have advance notice of each other’s presentations. A common rule of thumb is to have the presentation/paper available 2 weeks before the conference. Doing so not only gives you more time to practice but also is far more considerate of other session members.
  • Preparation of visual aids.
    • Visual aids can greatly improve the effectiveness of a presentation. While increasing an audiences’ interest, well-prepared slides can be extremely useful for clarifying and supporting key points in the presentation.
    • If you need to refer to a particular slide more than once, prepare duplicates of the slides such that you do not need to scroll back and forth during the presentation.
    • A picture is worth a thousand words. When feasible, including figures will more effectively communicate your message than a large, extensive table or words.
    • Prepare a back-up form of your visual aids. Sometimes technology does not work. If you are planning on using PowerPoint, prepare some back-up handouts in case you encounter a technical problem.
    • Coordinate technology plans with other session members. LCD projectors will be available in each session room. However, you will need to bring your own computer to use the LCD projectors. Coordinate with other session members to ensure that at least one of the session members will bring a laptop that can be used for the session. Then be sure to make plans for loading the presentations and making sure they work properly on the computer well before the session begins.
  • Ask yourself, what’s the point?
    • A visual serves one main purpose: to help make a point. This concept sometimes gets forgotten, and tables or charts are included in the presentation for no apparent reason. It is better to figure out your message and then determine the best way to share that message.
  • Interpret; don’t just report.
    • As the presenter, you are the expert on the subject being discussed. The “data speak for themselves” is a common expression. The trouble is, they oftentimes don’t and they often say different things to different people. Your job is to use your expertise and insights to help others understand the information.
  • Summarize.
    • Do not forget to allow time at the end of the presentation, and prior to giving suggestions for further research, to summarize the main points of your presentation. Keep in mind, many of your audience members, during the presentation, may have been engrossed in one particular element of your presentation, and missed other key points.
  • Please pay careful attention to time limits.
    • Please respect the time limits for the session; it is the polite and courteous thing to do.
    • As a general rule of thumb, plan on spending roughly one minute per slide. Therefore, if you have 12 minutes to present, you generally don’t want the number of slides in your presentation to exceed 12-15.
  • Bring plenty of handouts.
    • Audience members will probably expect something to take home from a tutorial. Handouts can be used as workbooks as one goes through the material. Make sure you bring plenty of copies. You might want to check about the room size for your session. You will probably also want to have a sign-up sheet available in case you run out. If instead you prefer to post your materials online to be downloaded, please bring mailing labels or cards that contain your Web site. Asking participants to write down long Web addresses will almost ensure that mistakes will be made.
  • Remember, they are visual aids.
    • The most important part of the presentation is you, the presenter. Visual aids may be a very important tool, but your words and conduct are primary. Be particularly careful about the number and amount of information in your visuals, and the number of handouts. After all, if the entire message is on the visuals, why do we need a presenter?
  • Accessibility of the presentation.
    • SIOP is committed to ensuring that conferences are accessible to people with disabilities. Each and every member of your audience deserves the opportunity to benefit from your presentation. Please help us with this effort by using the following guidelines:
      • Assume that there will be some members of your audience with disabilities.
        • Remember, disabilities are not always obvious. Some people will likely have difficulty seeing your visual aids and/or hearing your presentation. Be prepared. Design presentation materials that will be user-friendly to your whole audience.
      • Describe the information presented in your visual aids.
        • Help the audience see the information by describing and summarizing what’s being presented.
      • Whenever possible, offer materials that are easy to read.
        • Handouts with black print on white paper are generally preferred. If possible, provide large print copies of your presentation when requested.
      • Make yourself visible to the audience.
        • For the benefit of those who are deaf or hard of hearing, your mouth and face should be in direct view of the audience throughout the presentation. When speaking, avoid turning your back to the audience and standing in dimly lit areas of the room.
      • Use the microphone.
        • Even if many audience members can hear you without it, the hearing limited may not. Also, each presentation is recorded and sold, and if you are not using the microphone, it is often difficult to be heard on the audio.
      • Turn audio/visual off when not in use.
        • This will reduce background noise that is potentially distracting to your audience.
      • Allow extra time for reviewing information presented on visual aids.
        • Assume that some members of your audience will need time to look at the visual aids and then focus their attention on you for further information.
  • Show enthusiasm for your presentation!
    • If you cannot be excited about your topic, how can you expect anyone else to be?  Your first few comments will set the tone for the entire session. If you can show excitement for the session, it is more likely that the audience will as well.
  • Preparation is the key to success.
    • Planning for the session and helping presenters prepare will contribute to an interesting and informative session overall.
  • Plan the use of time.
    • Start and end the session promptly. Prepare an overall plan and approximate time schedule for the session before the conference.
  • Try to encourage active audience participation.
    • Although you may have some prearranged points to discuss, involve the audience from the beginning. If possible, ask them some general questions up front, and try to tailor your presentation to their interests.
  • If co-presenting, help other presenters prepare.
    • Offer to review the presenters’ presentation, plans, visuals, or handouts. Note any duplication in the content and suggest revisions to avoid excessive repetition.
    • Try to practice the delivery of the tutorial in advance, if possible.
  • Moderate the audience discussion.
    • Provide a clear description as to the nature of the session as soon as it starts, to orient the audience to the issues.
    • Repeat each question or comment before responding so that all can hear. A few minutes before the session should end, announce the next question will be the last. If necessary, politely interrupt the speaker.
    • Try to encourage a friendly feel to the session.

Presentation Suggestions for Panel Discussions

Panel discussion. In a panel discussion, the chairperson plays a very active role, serving as the moderator who asks questions of the panelists and ensures that all panelists (three to five people) have the opportunity to speak. Panel discussions should generate spontaneous interaction among panelists and between panelists and the audience. Diversity among panelists is important to the success of the session. Further, all panel discussion members must recognize the need for advance preparation. A panel discussion proposal should describe the questions that will be addressed by the panel, the underlying issues or themes to be discussed, and the structure or format of the session. Submissions that do not have at least two presenters with different affiliations in the session (i.e., every presenter cannot be from the same institution) are not accepted.

Suggestions for Effective Panel Discussion Presentations

BEFORE THE CONFERENCE….

Planning is Paramount (See SIOP Guidelines for All Session Types above)!

Prepare Visual Aids

  • Visual aids can greatly improve the effectiveness of a presentation. While increasing an audience’s interest, well-prepared slides can also clarify and support key points in the presentation.
    • If you need to refer to a particular slide more than once, prepare duplicates of the slides so you do not need to scroll back and forth during the presentation.
    • A picture is worth a thousand words. When feasible, including figures will more effectively communicate your message than a large, extensive table or words.
  • A visual serves one main purpose; to help make a point. This concept is sometimes forgotten, and tables or charts are included in the presentation for no apparent reason. It is better to figure out your message and then determine the best way to share that message.
  • Prepare the right number of visual aids
    • As a general rule of thumb, plan on spending roughly one minute per slide. If you have 12 minutes to present, you generally don’t want the number of slides in your presentation to exceed 12-15.
  • Make sure each visual can be read without strain from all parts of the room.
  • A common complaint about presentations is that the audience can’t read the visuals because the typeset is too small. For things such as large correlation matrices, it is not possible to present the information adequately. In such cases, it may be better to not present the correlation matrix. Make sure all your visual aids can be read from a distance. We recommend using a font size of 20 point or greater so your visuals will be legible.
  • Remember, they are visual aids only.
    • The most important part of the presentation is you, the presenter. Visual aids may be an important tool, but your words and conduct are primary. Be particularly careful about the number of handouts and the amount of information in your visuals. If the entire message is on the visuals, why do we need a presenter?
  • Create a summary visual aid
    • During the presentation your audience members may have been engrossed in one particular element of your presentation and missed other key points.
  • Consider the accessibility of the visual aids
  • SIOP is committed to ensuring that conferences are accessible to people with disabilities. Each and every member of your audience deserves the opportunity to benefit from your presentation.
    • Assume some members of your audience will be disabled. Remember, disabilities are not always obvious. Some people will likely have difficulty seeing your visual aids. Be prepared. Design presentation materials that are user-friendly for your whole audience.
  • Make materials easy to read. Handouts with black print on white paper are generally preferred. If possible, provide large print copies of your presentation when requested.
    • If you choose to bring handouts, make plenty of copies.
  • If you are using handouts, bring at least 40 copies. You might want to double-check the room size for your session. You will probably also want to have a sign-up sheet available in case you run out. If instead you prefer to post your materials online to be downloaded, bring mailing labels or cards that contain your Web site. Asking participants to write down long Web addresses will almost ensure that mistakes will be made.
    • Prepare a back-up form of your visual aids.
  • Sometimes technology does not work. If you are planning on using PowerPoint, prepare some back-up handouts in case you encounter a technical problem.

Prepare and Practice Your Presentation

  • Ensure the accessibility of your presentation.
    • SIOP is committed to ensuring that conferences are accessible to people with disabilities. Each and every member of your audience deserves the opportunity to benefit from your presentation.
  • Describe the information presented in your visual aids. Help the audience see the information by describing and summarizing what’s being presented.
    • Interpret; don’t just report.
    • As the presenter, you are the expert on the subject being discussed. The “data speak for themselves” is a common expression. The trouble is, they oftentimes don’t, or they say different things to different people. Your job is to use your expertise and insights to help others understand the information.
    • Summarize

Do not forget to allow time at the end of the presentation, and prior to giving suggestions for further research, to summarize the main points of your presentation.

Practice your talk to make certain you are within your allotted amount of time.

Send your presentation to other session members 2 weeks before the conference.

  • The best sessions are those that have a coherent theme and are well integrated. This is best accomplished when session members, including the discussant, have advance notice of each other’s presentations. A common rule of thumb is to make the presentation/paper available 2 weeks before the conference. Doing so not only gives you more time to practice, but is considerate of other session members.

Coordinate technology plans with other session members

  • LCD projectors will be available in each session room. However, you will need to bring your own computer to use the LCD projectors. Coordinate with other session members to ensure that at least one of the session members will bring a laptop that can be used for the session. Then be sure to make plans for loading the presentations and making sure they work properly on the computer well before the session begins.

AT THE CONFERENCE…

Before the Session Begins

  • Test technology and visual aids to ensure they are properly functioning.

During the Session

  • Show enthusiasm for your presentation!
  • For the benefit of those who are deaf or hard of hearing, your mouth and face should be in direct view of the audience during the presentation. When speaking, avoid turning your back to the audience or standing in dimly lit areas of the room
    • Use the microphone. (Even if many audience members can hear you without it, those with hearing disabilities may not. Also, since presentations are recorded and sold, if you don’t use the microphone, it is difficult to be heard on the audio.)
    • Turn audio/visual off when not in use. (This reduces background noise that is potentially distracting to your audience.)
  • Allow time for reviewing visual aids.
    • Assume some members of your audience will need time to look at the visual aids and then focus their attention on you for further information.
  • Respect other panelists’ time.
    • You want time to discuss your research and ideas, and so do the other panelists. Please respect their time; it is the polite and courteous thing to do. 
  • Realize the chair is in charge.
    • The chair has the job of moderating the session and ensuring it runs smoothly. Please respect his/her position. If you run long, don’t get mad at the chair for redirecting a question to another panelist. By adhering to the chair’s suggestions, the session runs more smoothly for everyone.

After the Session

Be prepared to distribute your paper (See SIOP Guidelines for All Session Types above).

Suggestions for Effective Panel Discussion Chairs

  • Preparation is the key to success.
    • Planning for the session and helping panelists prepare contributes to an interesting and informative session overall.
  • Plan the use of time.
    • Start and end the session promptly. As presenters are approaching their time limits, give them a prearranged signal that they should begin to conclude their presentations. You may need to stop a panelist to keep the session on track. To do this, you may want to politely say, “we really need to move on so we can stay within our allotted time.”
    • Plan a logical and informative segue between each presentation, so the session flows smoothly and the audience understands clearly how the next presentation is related to the other presentations.
    • The best way to ensure the session runs on time is to let panelists know before the conference how much time they will have for each question and who will be answering each question.
    • Prepare an overall plan and approximate time schedule for the session. Allow sufficient time at the end of the session for audience discussion and ample time for setup of the next session in the room. Remember sessions are 50 and 80 minutes – not 60 and 90!
    • Encourage your presenters to practice their responses
  • Help presenters prepare before the session.
    • Offer to review the paenlists’ presentation, plans, visuals, or handouts, should they have them. Note duplications in content and suggest revisions to avoid excessive repetition.
  • Work collaboratively with the panelists
    • Together, can you come up with an interesting spin to the session? Are there unique perspectives that can be addressed?
  • Ensure session members’ audio/visual needs are met
    • Check with each presenter to ensure that his/her audio/visual needs have been met. However, please realize that no new requests can be made at this late date.
  • Show enthusiasm for the session
    • Your first few comments will set the tone for the entire session. If you can show excitement for the session, it is more likely that the audience will as well.
  • Assist with seating of those with disabilities
    • Ensure that members of the audience can see and hear the presentations. Reserve a couple of seats in the front and back of the room for persons using wheelchairs, canes, crutches, or motorized vehicles.
  • Moderate the audience discussion
    • Provide a few general comments at the start of the session to orient the audience to the papers, and how they fit together.
    • Repeat each question or comment before responding so that all can hear. A few minutes before the session is scheduled to conclude, politely announce that the next question will be the last. If necessary, politely interrupt the speaker.
    • Try to encourage a friendly feel to the session.
  • A particularly useful set of tips for running effective panel discussions is available here: http://blogs.hbr.org/cs/2013/05/how_to_moderate_a_panel_like_a.html.

 

Presentation Suggestions for Poster Sessions

SIOP Presentation Suggestions for Poster Sessions

Poster.Several poster sessions will be organized to give participants opportunities to present individual papers. Poster sessions will be 50 minutes long. At each poster session, several authors simultaneously present their papers, primarily in a visual medium, with key excerpts from the papers displayed on large boards (4’ high by 8’ wide, positioned at eye-level). These boards are provided by SIOP. The audience circulates among posters and stops to discuss papers of particular interest with the authors. Papers submitted for poster presentation must represent completed work and be prepared according to instructions given in the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 5th Edition. Please note that non-empirical submissions advancing theoretical propositions ARE permitted. Top posters will again be featured this year during an evening social hour. No audiovisual equipment or electricity will be available for Poster Sessions.

New for SIOP 2018 – Discounted Fabric Posters!

PosterSmith prints posters on wrinkle resistant fabric, allowing you the convenience of folding and packing your poster as you would clothing rather than having to carry a poster tube while traveling.

SIOP poster presenters will enjoy a 15% discount on all PosterSmith orders, plus free 2 day shipping within the US! To receive this discount, simply click the PosterSmith button above and start your order.

For questions, please view the FAQs or contact 617-383-7772 or support@postersmith.com.

SIOP is providing this opportunity as an optional convenience to our poster presenters. This is not an endorsement of PosterSmith by SIOP, nor is SIOP responsible for any poster not printed or delivered to the presenter's satisfaction.

Suggestions for Effective Poster Presentations

Planning is Paramount (See SIOP Guidelines for All Session Types elsewhere on this page!

    • Make the poster readable from a distance of at least five feet.
      • Remember, poster sessions get very crowded and there may be many people trying to read a poster at a single time. For everyone to be able to read your work, it is very important that you use a font large enough for this purpose. A general rule of thumb would be to use a font size of at least 20. However, take a page and put it on a wall, then back up about five feet. If you can’t read it now, imagine how difficult it will be tread it in a crowded, busy room full of people.
    • Use bullet points to maximize information.
      • The temptation with posters is to cut and paste parts of the paper, or to talk in full sentences. Unfortunately, this is an inefficient way to convey the information. Bullet points help organize and convey a lot more information in a shorter space.
    • Provide only the key points.
      • Avoid the temptation to post excessive information on a poster. Even though people interested in your poster have the opportunity to read it for extended periods of time, it does not mean they want to. Most people only have time to get the main gist of the information: what you did, why it is important, and what it means. Provide only the key points that readers will be most interested in. Additional information can always be obtained in the full paper.
      • Similarly, be prepared to give brief, succinct summaries of your entire poster or major sections of the poster (e.g., Results). It’s not unusual for people to ask for quick synopses when too many people are reading the poster and there’s not enough room for everybody. Be prepared to verbally present the gist of your paper when asked.
    • Prepare professional-looking posters.
      • There are several ways you can prepare your poster for presentation at SIOP. Many presenters choose to print their posters on a regular printer. If you do so, be sure to use high-quality paper and a high-quality printer. It may also be helpful to mount the paper on pieces of cardstock to make it easier for the audience to read. Another option is to print the poster as a full all-in-one poster.
      • However you choose to prepare your poster, be sure to maximize the use of your available space. Poster sessions can become crowded and you may want to prepare your poster so that it allows the audience to physically move through the sections of your poster.
    • Try to interact with your audience.
      • One of the great elements of the poster presentation is the opportunity to interact with other SIOP members. Avoid the temptation to walk around the poster session or to leave your poster for extended periods of time. Ask readers if you can clarify anything, thank them for looking over your poster, etc. However you choose to do it, try to involve your audience with your research.
      • You should anticipate being at your poster for the entire session. Show up on time, and don’t leave early. There are a variety of other sessions that begin and end at different times; some people may only be able to attend the last 10 minutes of your poster session and will not have a chance to view your work if you depart early.
    • Remember:
      • Bring your own adhesives or materials for hanging your poster (e.g., thumbtacks). Sometimes these are not provided, or there are not enough. You don’t want to rely on the generosity of your fellow presenters, so be sure to bring your own.
      • A picture is worth a thousand words. When possible, presenting your results in figures is generally more informative and takes up less space than a table or words.

Be prepared to distribute your paper (See SIOP Guidelines for All Session Types).

Presentation Suggestions for Symposia

SIOP Presentation Suggestions for Symposia

A symposium is a multi-presenter session. This session type welcomes (and replaces) all submissions that in the past were submitted to: (a) symposium; (b) practice forum; (c) academic-practitioner collaborative forum; (d) education, teaching, and learning forum; and (e) theoretical advancement. Any multi-presenter session proposing research, practice, theory, and teaching-oriented content should be submitted here. Participants in a symposium/forum should include a chairperson and three to four presenters. A symposium/forum often includes discussants, but it does not have to do so. We encourage submissions in which diverse and novel perspectives are presented, including sessions in which the audience plays the role of discussant and the chair facilitates the discussion. Stand-alone papers are not assigned to symposia; such papers should be submitted as posters. Although individual presentations within a symposium/forum may have all authors from the same institution, the overall session must contain presenters from at least two different affiliations. This submission rule originally resulted from considerable feedback and concern about sessions becoming “advertisements” for products by a single company or research being presented from a single academic program. We intend the program to be science based and inclusive for all participants. Sufficient time should be allotted for audience participation. It is assumed that first authors indicated on a submission will serve as the actual presenter at the SIOP conference.

Suggestions for Effective Symposium Presentations

BEFORE THE CONFERENCE…

Planning is paramount (See SIOP Guidelines for All Session Types)!

Prepare visual aids

  • Visual aids can greatly improve the effectiveness of a presentation. While increasing an audience’s interest, well-prepared slides can also clarify and support key points in the presentation.
    • If you need to refer to a particular slide more than once, prepare duplicates of the slides so you do not need to scroll back and forth during the presentation.
    • A picture is worth a thousand words. When feasible, including figures will more effectively communicate your message than a large, extensive table or words.
    • Ask yourself, what’s the point?
  • A visual serves one main purpose: to help make a point. This concept is sometimes forgotten, and tables or charts are included in the presentation for no apparent reason. It is better to figure out your message and then determine the best way to share that message.
  • Prepare the right number of visual aids.
    • As a general rule of thumb, plan on spending roughly one minute per slide. If you have 12 minutes to present, you generally don’t want the number of slides in your presentation to exceed 12-15.
  • Make sure each visual can be read without strain from all parts of the room.
    • We recommend using a font size of 20 point or greater so your visuals will be legible. It is generally not useful to present tables with large amounts of information on a slide.
  • Remember, they are visual aids only.
    • The most important part of the presentation is you, the presenter. Visual aids may be an important tool, but your words and conduct are primary. Be particularly careful about the number of handouts and the amount of information in your visuals. If the entire message is on the visuals, why do we need a presenter?
  • Allow time for reviewing visual aids.
    • Assume some members of your audience will need time to look at the visual aids and then focus their attention on you for further information.
  • Carefully consider the structure of your talk
    • Many presenters start by introducing the topic, why it is important, discussing theory and hypotheses, then methods, results, and conclusions, or some variant of this for non-empirical presentations.  You do not have to structure your talk in this manner, but it is a structure that many audience members are familiar with.
    • Keep in mind that you probably can not dive deep into detail in any one of these sections given the time frame.
    • SIOPers tend to like data!  So consider spending more time discussing and interpreting what your results mean versus going through details of nuanced theory.  This does not mean that you should spend a great deal of time on the details of the statistical analyses (unless it is a statistic-focused session of course!); rather the focus should be on the findings and their implications.
    • Remember anyone who wants the full complete story can request your full paper.
    • Do not forget to allow time at the end of the presentation, and prior to giving suggestions for further research, to summarize the main points of your presentation. Keep in mind that many of your audience members may have been engrossed in one particular element of your presentation and missed other key points.

Practice your talk to make certain you are within your allotted amount of time

  • This is key!  Audience members become easily frustrated when presenters must rush through the results and interpretations because of poor timing!

Send your presentation to other session members in advance

  • The best sessions are those that have a coherent theme and are well integrated. This is best accomplished when session members, including the discussant, have advance notice of each other’s presentations. A common rule of thumb is to make the presentation/paper available 2 weeks before the conference. Doing so not only gives you more time to practice but is considerate of other symposium/forum members.

Coordinate technology plans with other session members

  • LCD projectors will be available in each session room. However, you will need to bring your own computer to use the LCD projectors. Coordinate with other session members to ensure that at least one of the session members will bring a laptop that can be used for the session. Then be sure to make plans for loading the presentations and making sure they work properly on the computer well before the session begins.  Note that VGA converters for mac are not readily available, so if you have a mac and an adapter, it is best to bring both.

AT THE CONFERENCE…

Before the session begins

  • Arrive a few minutes early to ensure that technology is working properly.

During the session

  • Be enthusiastic!
  • Use the microphone.
    • Even if many audience members can hear you without it, those with hearing disabilities may not.
  • Realize the chair is in charge.
    • The chair has the job of moderating the session and ensuring it runs smoothly. Please respect his/her position. If you run long, don’t get mad at the chair for telling you to sit down. By adhering to the chair’s suggestions, the session runs more smoothly for everyone.

After the session

Suggestions for Effective Symposium Chairs

  • Preparation is the key to success.
    • Planning for the session and helping presenters prepare contributes to an interesting and informative session overall.
  • Plan the use of time.
    • Start and end the session promptly. As presenters are approaching their time limits, give them a prearranged signal that they should begin to conclude their presentations. You may need to stop a presenter to keep the session on track. To do this, you may want to politely say, “we really need to move on so we can stay within our allotted time.”
    • Plan a logical and informative segue between each presentation so that the symposia/forums flows smoothly and the audience understands clearly how the next presentation is related to the other presentations.
    • The best way to ensure the session runs on time is to let presenters know before the conference how much time they will have and the order in which they’ll be presenting.
    • Prepare an overall plan and approximate time schedule for the session. Allow sufficient time at the end of the session for audience discussion and ample time for setup of the next session in the room.  Remember sessions are 50 and 80 minutes – not 60 and 90!
    • Encourage your presenters to practice their presentations to be sure they won’t exceed the time allotted.
    • Be sure to sit in a visible position for the presenters to easily see your cues, and let presenters know where you will be during the presentation. A good rule of thumb is to let presenters know when they have 5, 2, and 1 minute remaining in the presentations.
  • Help presenters prepare before the symposium.
    • Offer to review the presenters’ presentation, plans, visuals, or handouts. Note duplications in content and suggest revisions to avoid excessive repetition.
  • Ensure that session members and the discussant review each other’s papers before the conference.
    • It is much easier to see similarities and differences between papers when everyone reviews them beforehand. It will also be possible to reduce redundancies in the presentation. A particularly effective strategy is for someone to provide some guidance for how the session will go (e.g., who goes first). This way, other presenters will know whether or not they should spend time on introductory material. If the presentations all address different aspects of a topic area, the presenters may consider spending a few minutes discussing the topic area more generally so each presenter can focus on what is unique in his/her study.
    • As a general rule of thumb, presenters should have their materials to the discussant at least 2 weeks before the conference (some discussants may want more time, so be sure to check).
    • One useful technique is to set up an e-mail list including all session members. This makes it easier to communicate, and ensures everyone has access to the same information.
  • Work collaboratively with the discussant and presenters.
    • Together, can you come up with an interesting spin to the session? Are there unique perspectives that can be addressed?
  • Show enthusiasm for the session.
    • Your first few comments will set the tone for the entire session. If you can show excitement for the session, it is more likely that the audience will as well.
  • Moderate the audience discussion.
    • Provide a few general comments at the start of the session to orient the audience to the papers and how they fit together.
    • Repeat each question or comment before responding so that all can hear.
    • Try to encourage a friendly feel to the session.

Suggestions for Effective Symposia Discussants

  • Remember you play a key role!
    • The discussant can tie a diverse set of papers together into a coherent theme. In many cases, the discussant can make an otherwise good symposium/forum exceptional. The best way for this to happen is to prepare in advance.
  • Be constructively critical.
    • Remember, you were asked to be the discussant because you are the expert. Now is the chance for you to demonstrate your expertise and provide insight into the domain of study. You may, for example, suggest ways of addressing issues raised in the studies, or other ways to move research in the area forward.
    • Try to find at least one:
      • good thing to say about each paper
      • thing that could be improved in each paper
      • connection among the set of papers
      • implication for research
      • implication for practice
    • Try to avoid spending too much time on each paper individually; focus on connections across papers and general themes. Be sure to give each paper equal attention.
    • Avoid focusing too much on specific details of each presentation. Instead, highlight key ideas, pose challenging questions, and identify key themes across the papers.
  • Prepare general discussion points beforehand.
    • The best way to guarantee an interactive session is to have a set of discussion points that strike to the heart of the session. For example, why were differences between studies found? What are the implications of these studies for research in this area? How can these studies improve practice? Preparing these questions before the session ensures the session moves along smoothly.
    • Consider making slides that convey this information.
    • Prepare at least a couple of questions for the audience.
  • Avoid talking about your own research.
    • Although you may have useful research that bears on the issues, remember your role is to discuss and critique the current set of presentations. This is not the forum for introducing your new ground-breaking study. Mention it if it is relevant, but focus the majority of your attention on the presenters research.
  • Realize you don’t have much time.
    • Even the most well-intentioned session chair cannot control some presenters, and it is possible the session will leave you with little time. Anticipate what would be the one or two comments you would want to make sure everyone hears? If a presenter does take too much time, avoid the temptation to chastise the presenter for his/her inconsideration.
  • Realize you might not receive the papers in advance.
    • If everyone does his or her job, this won’t be issue. Don’t assume they all will. You might have to comment on a presentation without having read the paper beforehand. Having read and commented on the other papers beforehand will make this easier for you.
  • Be sure to spend adequate time preparing for the session.
    • Carefully read each paper ahead of time, and read them more than once. One suggestion is to read each paper once to identify key critiques and comments and a second time to identify themes across the papers.
      • Type up your remarks or personalized feedback ahead of time and give each presenter a copy. Many presenters will not have the time or energy to write down everything you say. Remember, you should only be focusing on the major issues/themes in your presentation, so the typed feedback can include additional specific feedback to the presenters that you did not discuss. Providing them with your typed comments after the session could help your comments have greater impact.